White Dog Art

Archive for 2018|Yearly archive page

holder of the dream

In Art Watercolor Gallery, Things with Feathers, Ravens and Crows on March 19, 2018 at 4:20 pm



Aceo Original watercolor

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The raven in this painting is what is called a ‘Spirit Raven.’ It is found mainly in British Columbia. Very rare bird. I personally love genetically white birds and animals. They seem sacred and of course Native Americans  regard the Spirit Raven as sacred.

The common raven has a 4 ft wingspan and is over two feet from head to tail. The raven is often misidentified as a crow – a closely related bird. Ravens are uncommon in populated urban areas. If you see a “really big crow” in the city, the chances are good that it really is a crow and not a raven.

Ravens soar more than crows. If you see a “crow” soaring for more than a few seconds, take another look – it might be a raven. Common Ravens can do a somersault in flight and even fly upside down. Ravens are longer necked in flight than crows.


golden eagle

In Art Watercolor Gallery, Eagles, Things with Feathers, Wild Things on February 22, 2018 at 5:00 pm

watercolor aceo

Once while walking with my dog Buddha at the lake a large bald eagle swooped down on him while he was wading in the water directly beneath shrubby bushes and trees. I saw this all happen and it happened in an instant. Buddha is a cattle dog weighing in at 70 pounds so I would guess that when the eagle got close enough to measure him……no sale. The eagle shot upward with dog unharmed. If Buddha had been smaller, perhaps he would have made a meal for the eagle. 

There were several eagle families who called the lake home. They would sit high in the cedars picking away at their fish or small animal. Such sights was I privileged to see and will never forget.

Eagles figure prominently in the mythology of nearly every Native American tribe. In most Native cultures, eagles are considered medicine birds with impressive magical powers, and play a major role in the religious ceremonies of many tribes. 

Eagle conveys the powers and messages of the spirit; it is man’s connection to the divine because it flies higher than any other bird. The eagle is symbolic of the importance of honesty and truthful principles.

Both Bald and Golden Eagles (and their feathers) are highly revered and considered sacred within American Indian traditions, culture and religion. They are honored with great care and shown the deepest respect. They represent honesty, truth, majesty, strength, courage, wisdom, power and freedom.

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warriors of the rainbow

In Art Watercolor Gallery, Wolves on January 22, 2018 at 3:48 pm

watercolor 4 x 5 1/2018

Spirit of the Wolf

‘The spirit of the wolf resides in my heart

Mostly peacefully, but ever wild

Running in time to the blowing wind,

Dancing in the clouds that drift in the heavens

The spirit of the wolf resides in my soul.






sacred wisdom

In Art Watercolor Gallery, Ravens and Crows, Things with Feathers, Wild Things on January 7, 2018 at 4:32 pm

Watercolor 1/2018 5 x 7


This is just one of so many Native American tales about Raven as well as other animals. I love to read them.


When Raven was killed

Raven had played so many tricks on mankind for so long that one day a great chief decided to kill him. The chief caught Raven unaware and threw him into a large skin bag. Then he began to climb to the top of a steep mountain. Raven asked from inside the bag “what are you doing, where are we going.” The chief ignored Raven. Raven told the chief that bad things would happen if he hurt Raven. But the chief did not listen and finally on top of the mountain, he threw Raven off the mountain. Raven was torn to pieces falling. The chief had killed Raven.

Everyone in the village was happy and they celebrated for days. Then they noticed that all the water was gone. The lakes and rivers were dry. The shaman told them that the water had vanished because the chief had killed Raven. Now the people wanted Raven to come back.

The shaman told the chief that he would have to put Raven back together again. So the chief put all the pieces back together again. Raven came back to life and started to fly away. “Stop” cried the chief. “All the water is gone and only you can return it.” Raven flew higher and said “Look around you, there is water everywhere.”

The chief then turned and saw that the lake was full and that the river ran deep and fast again. As Raven disappeared in the distance, the chief promised never to try to kill Raven again.

Because of his powers and role in their heritage, Natives do not kill ravens.